23 February 1922 diary of Dr John Stewart Muir (1845-1938) of Selkirk

An approach to a spring day. Quite fresh + no snow visible except the remains of wreaths on hills. Coryza much better possibly from the use of menthol snuff yesterday. Tapped Mr Geo. Scott’s1 Hydrothorax2 but found it an Empyema3 and only got 3-4 oz. The needle of the hypodermic broke in the skin. Sent away an affidavit as creditor of A J Milne, Aberdeen4, who have swindled M. & G.5 of £7. Contacted Chalmers6 about it + about making my will. Helen7 was at a “Brownie” entertainment at Heatherlie Church Hall + Miss Wallace8 was here looking after Baby Harper9, a dear wee thing.

1 George Scott is unidentified

2 Hydrothorax is the collection of serous fluid within the pleural cavities, commonly a consequence of cardiac failure, but also linked to renal failure and cirrhosis of the liver

3 Empyema is also called pyothorax or purulent pleuritis, a condition in which pus gathers in the area between the lungs and the inner surface of the chest wall

4 A J Milne is unidentified but is referred to in Dr Muir’s diary entry for 8 February 1922 in connection with the Liquidator

5 The Muir and Graham medical co-partnership

6 James George Chalmers (about 1860-1943), solicitor and bank agent; at Selkirk at least 1903-1942, at Hillside Terrace and later at The Floors, Russell Place, he was Town Clerk Depute around 1903

7 Helen Frances ‘Mousey’ Muir (1880-1963), Dr Muir’s third daughter and sometime housekeeper

8 Miss Wallace is not yet identified though it may be possible to do so when the 1921 Census is published later this year

9 This may refer to Esther Ramsay Harper, see Dr Muir’s diary entry for 19 February 1922

[Source: Scottish Borders Archives & Local History Service SBA/657/25, Dr J S Muir of Selkirk, medical practitioner, journal for 1922]

Published by

rumblingclint

Archivist, interests include Dr John Stewart Muir 1845-1938) of Selkirk, general practitioner, and Seton Paul Gordon (1886–1977), naturalist, author and photographer

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