3 November 1921 diary of Dr John Stewart Muir (1845-1938) of Selkirk

It was lucky we took our run yesterday for today was wet + Misty + equally cold. Yesterday we saw the hill tops quite well. Winifred1 kept her bed. Helen2 went to Gilmanscleuch to lunch. I saw a bigger town list than usual which took me till 2.30 + I had to go down to Sloethornbank after lunch. I was about 11/2 hours at the Hospital going over the swabs3 (dates) 4 went out yesterday + 2 today leaving 15 Diph. + 3 Scarlets. I have been elected as a representative of County Panel Committees on the Scottish sub-committee4.

1 Margaret Winifred Armitage (1874-1970), who had a very cold day out the preceding day, was the daughter of William Armitage, cotton merchant, and Margaret Petrie Armitage; her sister Dorothy had married Francis ‘Frank’ Muir (1877-1972), electrical engineer, son of the Reverend Gavin Struthers ‘Guy’ Muir Dr Muir’s brother, and thus Dr Muir’s nephew

2 Helen Frances ‘Mousey’ Muir (1880-1963), Dr Muir’s third daughter and sometime housekeeper

3 There was a long-standing outbreak of Diphtheria and Scarlet Fever in Selkirk, through a large part on 1921 and into the following year

4 It is not immediately clear what Dr Muir’s appointment was unless it was to the Rural sub-committee

[Source: Scottish Borders Archives & Local History Service SBA/657/24, Dr J S Muir of Selkirk, medical practitioner, journal for 1921]

Published by

rumblingclint

Archivist, interests include Dr John Stewart Muir 1845-1938) of Selkirk, general practitioner, and Seton Paul Gordon (1886–1977), naturalist, author and photographer

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s