4 September 1920 diary of Dr John Stewart Muir (1845-1938) of Selkirk

Some rain in the morning + a gale first S.W. then N.W. + cold. Motored to Faldonside making some calls on the way. Miss Dees1 had restless night + temp. not as low as usual. Swelling much less. Took all the wadding off her head. In the evening she was feeling better: had neither headache nor backache but slight squint. Gave her Proxx Bromide to 1/1 casc evac.2 Rob Currie3, Byethorn broke his left fibula. Gave him gas while David [Graham] put it up. H. + D.4 were at Shawpark helping Boylan5 to entertain the children of Bishop of Barrow6 who is taking McCall’s7 place.

1 Phyllis Mary ‘Fiff’ Dees (1899-1920) had suffered a head injury in a car accident 24 August 1920; she was the daughter of Robert Irwin Dees (1872-1923) and Edith Mary Boileau Dees née Henderson, the new (1920) tenants at Faldonside

2 It is not clear what the XX refers to, but an ever-helpful follower has punted out that the 3 symbol represents one dram (or drachm) and the following symbol is for one tablet. So, it appears he gave her 1 dram of potassium bromide (as a sedative) in the form of one tablet. 1.77 grams.

3 Robert Currie (c.1875-1934), hosiery manufacturer, son of Robert Currie (about 1857-1923), woollen hosiery manufacturer, and Mary Murray; married 1stly, 1898, Maggie Brown (died 1899) and, 2ndly, 1906, Julia Johnston Lindsay (died 1961). He lived at Byethorn, Selkirk [where the Selkirk High School is today]

4 Helen Frances ‘Mousey’ Muir (1880-1963) and Andrina Dorothy ‘Dora’ Muir (1882-1978), Dr Muir’s third and youngest daughters respectively

5 John Dun Boylan (1850-1924), civil engineer, acquaintance of Dr Muir, sometime of Shawmount, Selkirk

6 The Bishop of Barrow, 1909-1926, was the Right Reverend Campbell West Watson (1877-1953), who held it in plurality with a Residentiary Canonry at Carlisle Cathedral until 1921, then with the Rectory of Aldingham, near Ulverston, Cumbria, he later became Bishop of Christchurch, New Zealand; nowhere is he referred to as being at Selkirk and from Alumni Cantabrigienses it is quite clear that he never held a living in Scotland, nor does it record that he had children, whereas Mr McCall had lost his wife Mabel Lovat Armstrong in 1917 and had children Mabel Mona (1911-), John Grice Armstrong (1913-), Alan George (1914-) and Arthur James (1916-)

7 Alumni Cantabrigienses notes that James George McCall, rector of St John’s Episcopal Church 1910-1921, moved to Jordanhill, Glasgow in 1921

[Source: Scottish Borders Archives & Local History Service SBA/657/23, Dr J S Muir of Selkirk, medical practitioner, journal for 1920]

Published by

rumblingclint

Archivist, interests include Dr John Stewart Muir 1845-1938) of Selkirk, general practitioner, and Seton Paul Gordon (1886–1977), naturalist, author and photographer

2 thoughts on “4 September 1920 diary of Dr John Stewart Muir (1845-1938) of Selkirk”

  1. I’m not sure what the XX refers to, but the 3 symbol represents one dram (or drachm) and the following one is for one tablet. So, it appears he gave her 1 dram of potassium bromide (as a sedative) in the form of one tablet. 1.77 grams.

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